Who is Furqan Bangalzai who is facing a British ban

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Quetta’s Furqan Bangalzai is in a Karachi jail after being convicted by an anti-terrorism court in the Sehwan blast case.
Who is Furqan Bangalzai who is facing a British ban
Apart from the Sehwan blast case against Furqan Bangalzai, cases have also been filed in Gadap and Malir police stations in Karachi. (Photo by Sindh Police)


Furqan alias Farooq Bangalzai, a member of the banned Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, which was banned by the British government a few days ago, is currently lodged in a Karachi jail.

 According to official records obtained by Independent Urdu from Sindh Police, Furqan Bangalzai, a resident of Quetta, has been lodged in a Karachi jail after being convicted by an anti-terrorism court in the Sehwan blast case.

A statement issued by the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office on the occasion of World Human Rights Day on December 10 stated that the Myanmar army’s weapons, other equipment, and funding on four areas of human rights violations. Restrictions on access were imposed. 

At the same time, Furqan Bangalzai, a member of the banned organization Lashkar-e-Jhangvi in ​​Pakistan, was also banned.

A statement issued by the British government said that Furqan Bangalzai was involved in the 2017 bomb blast at the shrine of elder Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in Sindh, which killed 70 people.

In her response to the ban, Yasmeen Qureshi, co-chairperson of the All Parties Group on Pakistan in the British Parliament, wrote a letter to the British Minister of State for Asia, Amanda Maling, referring to Pakistan with the Myanmar army as “creating a misleading impression”. Describing it as “disappointing”, he called for clarification of the real situation.

According to a report in Pakistan’s Associated Press of Pakistan (APP), Yasmeen Qureshi wrote in his letter: Outgoing sanctions cannot be equated. He questioned: “Why was an attempt made to create the impression that a ban imposed on a person is a ban imposed on Pakistan?”

In the letter, Qureshi requested that it be clarified that the sanctions imposed by the UK were not against Pakistan but against Furqan Bangalzai, a member of a militant group.

Furqan Bangalzai and his accomplice Ali Jakhrani alias Murshid and others were blamed by Sindh police for the February 2017 suicide attack on the shrine of Sindh Sufi saint Syed Usman Marwandi alias Lal Shahbaz Qalandar that killed more than 70 people. Was declared.

According to police, the blast was planned in the Dera Murad Jamali area of ​​Balochistan. Ali Jakhrani alias Murshid was arrested by Sindh Police Counter-Terrorism Department in November 2017 while Furqan Bangalzai was arrested along with another accomplice Ali Akbar alias Haji in February 2019.

Following their arrest, on February 20, 2019, the then Deputy Inspector General (DIG) Karachi East and Senior Superintendent of Police (SSP) Malir Irfan Bahadur in a briefing to the media said that both the accused belonged to the banned organization Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. told you. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi had in the past joined the Khurasan branch of ISIS

Nadir Ali Jakhrani alias Murshid and Furqan Bangalzai were sentenced to death 70 times each in a Karachi anti-terrorism court in May 2020 for facilitating the suicide bomber Abrar Brohi’s attack on Lal Shahbaz Qalandar’s shrine. Was ordered to pay a fine of Rs 70 lakh.

During the court proceedings, the police in their investigative report told the court that the arrested militants Furqan Bangalzai and Ali Akbar said during the interrogation that they had received extremist training from Afghanistan and were killed after joining ISIS. Extremist leader Mufti Hidayatullah orders Sehwan blast to facilitate Hazara and Christian communities in Quetta and targets police

Apart from the Sehwan blast case against Furqan Bangalzai, cases have also been filed in various police stations in Gadap and Malir in Karachi. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, a splinter group of the militant group Sipah-e-Sahaba, came to prominence in the mid-1990s when sectarian violence in Pakistan escalated.

The Pakistani government banned Lashkar-e-Jhangvi in ​​2001. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi has claimed responsibility for major terrorist attacks in Pakistan in the past

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