Allegations of ‘harassment and violence against the Australian Government

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An Australian woman has filed a lawsuit against the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) government over human rights abuses while in remand in a Canberra jail.
Allegations of 'harassment and violence against the Australian Government
An Indigenous Australian woman performs a smoking ritual on July 6, 2015, on the occasion of her National Day. Indigenous Australians have suffered rights violations since the 1920s (File photo: AFP)


An Australian woman has filed a lawsuit against the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) government over human rights abuses while in remand in a Canberra jail.

An Australian woman has filed a lawsuit against the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) government over human rights abuses while in remand in a Canberra jail.

An unnamed 37-year-old local ‘Ngunawal’ woman, who was also allegedly sexually assaulted, claimed in a court document that she was repeatedly beaten by police officers at the Alexander Mekonochi Correctional Center in January this year. Was subjected to cruel treatment.

The woman claimed that the guards forcibly stripped her naked and searched her while the male inmates of the jail were also watching the scene. According to the woman, a pacemaker was implanted in her body which affected her lungs and she also developed Borderline Personality Disorder.

The woman also said that she was not allowed to attend her grandmother’s last rites, which left her depressed. He claimed that he had been transferred to the prison’s crisis support unit because he was “concerned about my safety and mental health.”

It was also claimed that a team of police officers had a knife when they decided to forcibly search him naked. He also said that CCTV camera footage of the incident was seen live in the operation room of the jail.

According to an ABC News report, court documents, which included audio recordings, point to nude searches. An officer claimed to have seen the woman trying to cover private parts of her body with her hands. The woman also said that an officer had a knife which was said to be used to tear her clothes. In the audio recording, an officer can be heard saying, “Who has the knife?”

Authorities did not use a knife after the woman conducted a nude search, ABC reported. Julie Tongs, chief executive of the Vanonga Nemitajah Aboriginal Health Center, which runs a daily clinic in the prison, told The Guardian that authorities should be held accountable.

Julie Tongs said: There have been many failures in human rights law and violations of the Reform Act. And yet nothing has changed. Nothing happened The recommendations called for a second body scanning machine. Why didn’t they already have body scanning machines? They should be installed. “

He said: We are providing all possible support from Vononga and he has been reunited with his family but people do not take seriously what is happening here in ATC and jail and so on. So we need a Royal Commission

The ACT’s Inspector of Correctional Services, on the other hand, issued a report shortly after the incident was reported, saying that although the search was legal, officers did not “properly consider” the woman’s human rights.

Inspector General of Correctional Services Neil McAllister said in a statement that the decision to use force was extremely risky and did not comply with human rights law. He described the incident as “disgraceful and traumatic” and recommended that two body scanners be installed in the jail to prevent nude searches in the future.

The woman wrote a painful statement about the incident in a letter shortly after it came to light. In the letter, obtained from The Guardian, he wrote: “Here I remind you that I was raped. So you can only imagine the horror, the screaming, the humiliating feeling, the fear, and the embarrassment I experienced. Also, I am sad and depressed about not attending my grandmother’s last rites

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